My values are Labour values.

I want to help build a stronger, more caring society. I am passionate about Dunedin, and I bring considerable energy and wide experience to the task of representing this electorate.

My diverse work background has given me an understanding of the economic and social levers that can be pulled to achieve meaningful change.

Please read some of the discussions included here. I welcome your comments.

- David Clark

Week number one in Wellington

Parliament is sitting once more. I’ve enjoyed the chance to show demonstrable support for Dunedin’s design industry – by sporting a newly minted Tamsin Cooper jacket.

David Clark parliamentary swearing in

Political analysts up and down the country have lept at the chance to have a say on the tailored blazer.  This is largely because Parliament’s reconstitution has otherwise produced few surprises.

John Armstrong’s column is here. Jane Clifton’s view is here.  It was also covered on TV and wireless, and by Dave Cannan in the ODT’s ‘Wash’.

Early on, I also seized the opportunity to make my first contribution to the 51st Parliament – taking a call in the Address in Reply debate to raise concerns about New Zealand’s future in light of big changes coming our way.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Universal Basic Income anyone?

Ensuring all members of society have the basics to survive (and prosper) is the bread and butter policy of every social democratic party – if you’ll excuse the pun.  We want equity of access to justice, healthcare, education and so on, but we also want to make sure all people have enough money to get by.

Longer term, serious changes will need to be made to our society if this vision is to become a reality.  These changes need to be made, not just to meet present challenges, but to meet future ones. If you haven’t watched the video below – ‘humans need not apply’ – please do. It gives a sense of the enormity of the transformation required.

Universal Basic Income anyone?

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

Reflections on provisional result

First, if you voted for me this election: thank you. I am grateful for your support and will work hard to repay the trust you have placed in me.  Thanks also to those who supported me throughout my first term. I very much look forward to serving Dunedin North for a second term as your electorate MP.

A full week has passed since election night. Every day since has proved afresh (were it necessary) that a day is a long time in politics.

Now, the obvious. Election night 2014 was a huge disappointment for Labour supporters. A party vote tally of 24.7% was no mandate to lead a new progressive Government. It was a trouncing.

For Labour: listening, reflection, learning and rebuilding must now occur.

Questions must be asked. Why, for example, was Labour’s share of the electorate vote up 9.3% across New Zealand? And why did the party vote slump whilst we won more, rather than fewer, electorate seats?

For Labour the overall election result was grim. Perhaps less obvious on the night, hidden in the local results were some small silver linings.

Dunedin North was National’s fifth-worst result. Projections based on Labour’s difficult 2011 election defeat would have seen National comfortably win the party vote in Dunedin North. Instead, taking boundary changes for this election into account, National’s booth-by-booth party vote actually took a 1.3% hit (compared to a rise across the country of 0.8%).  On election night Labour actually won the party vote in Dunedin North.  It remains to be seen whether Labour will hold the party vote once special votes are counted. But the fact it was close must be a huge disappointment for National – with so much rural territory coming into the electorate in 2014, and an upswing of support elsewhere in the country.

Party Vote Dunedin North 2014 provisional

A large part of National’s party vote decline can only be put down to the intelligence and insight of the voters in Dunedin North. But I believe no small amount of credit is due also the experience, wisdom and hard work of volunteers on my campaign. They were motivated to campaign because they believe in creating a better New Zealand.  Still, I feel I owe them a huge debt of thanks on behalf of the people Labour represents.

At a candidate level, I was chuffed that my personal majority was the highest of any Labour MP in the South Island. Again, I think this a reflection on the contributions of many.  In particular, I am grateful to those who have shared and continue to share the fight for a common-sense outcome at Invermay.  And also the many many people who have educated me about shortfalls in New Zealand’s health system, particularly as they play out in the South.  I must thank the staff in my office too – whose hard work and dedication is often the very thing electorate MPs are judged upon.

Candidate Vote Dunedin North 2014 provisional

In addition to the musings above, here are a few early reflections on what went right in Dunedin:

1/ I think Labour’s relatively strong showing in both North and South Dunedin owes a lot to the positive plan for Dunedin that Clare Curran and I launched when the Labour Leader visited the city early in the campaign. Our simple message – that Labour would save Invermay, grow a modern engineering cluster around Hillside, and upgrade our dilapidated hospital – resonated.  It resonated because it reflected local concerns, and because it gave concrete examples about what Labour’s wider ‘vote positive’ campaign meant in practice.

2/ I also think tying this local campaign to a party vote message worked. Our additional billboards were simple: Labour will save Invermay; Labour will support local manufacturing; Labour will upgrade Dunedin Hospital.

3/ Literally hundreds of local volunteers and supporters contributing to a campaign generates an energy of its own.  Everyday heroes like Ciaran and Heather bring a lot of people with them. If you have hundreds of heroes, thousands of people in their wider social circles will be predisposed towards hearing what these heroes have to say – before they ever don a rosette. The days of mass-membership may have passed, but healthy and active membership does make a difference.

I’m keen to hear your feedback on other things you think influenced the local result.

I’ll be back in my regular pattern of Saturday door-knocking before too long. But if you have something to share, don’t wait for me to knock on 18,000 other doors first. Drop me a line. I’ll be pleased to hear your considered reflections.

9 COMMENTS

Heather and Labour

Heather has been a Labour activist since forever. She is a volunteer who wants kids to be able to access their dreams. Find out why Heather is campaigning so hard for Labour in Dunedin North.

For more Dunedin North Labour stories click here and here.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Ciaran and Labour

Ciaran wants to see students reach their potential. He also wants a more equal society.

He’s new to campaigning, but he’s doing a fine job. Find out why Ciaran’s working so hard for Labour in Dunedin North.

If you are a Labour supporter and able to join Ciaran and other volunteers for a few hours helping out on election day, we’d love to hear from you. Please email campaign@davidclark.org.nz

 

LEAVE A COMMENT

On the Campaign Trail

Port School

Ice Bucket ChallengeLauren Labour BusOU PasifikaPort DoorknockersBus in Port ChalmersTV3 Interview

LEAVE A COMMENT

Here’s Why

My story and values. I’m seeking your support. Here’s why.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Labour’s positive plan for Dunedin

Yesterday David Cunliffe was in town to announce Labour’s positive plan for Dunedin.

Read the press release for a flavour of the announcements.

– Labour commits to upgrading Dunedin Hospital. A major capital rebuild to create a modern teaching hospital will begin in our first term.

– Labour commits to saving Invermay.

– Labour commits to re-opening and upgrading Hillside as the centre of an engineering cluster.

 

Cunliffe with Young LabourLabour's positive plan for Dunedin launchUniversity Union main common roomCunliffe Dunedin Chamber Address

Some good coverage from CH39 Dunedin TV.

For a fuller analysis, click the link to read the front page lead in the Otago Daily Times or the subsequent editorial.

1 COMMENT

Positive for Dunedin

I enjoy campaigning.  Now Parliament has risen, I get to spend more of my week in Dunedin with the people who elected me. Whether at street corner meetings, during door-step conversations or at meet the candidate events, I love the direct feedback.  Most Dunedin people are hoping for a Labour-led government.  Thankfully that is looking more and more likely by the day.

Opportunities for people to meet their local candidates involve a fair bit of organising. My thanks to all of the groups that are hosting events – as well as to all of the volunteers campaigning hard for Labour in Dunedin North.

Brockville Street CornerChatting at HRINZ meet the candidates forumDavid Clark with Aaron SmithOn CampusSt Margarets College visitWith Pasifika community group

Photos clockwise from top left: a snowy street corner meeting in Brockville; snap! – matching shirts at the HRINZ meet the candidates event; meeting students on campus; with Pasifika community group; at St Margaret’s College; with All Black and Highlander Aaron Smith.

LEAVE A COMMENT

Vote Positive

Karitane Internet Petition David Clark with Sue O'NeillHoardings VolunteersPalmerston DoorknockBackbenches with Wallace Chapman

It is only a matter of weeks until the September 20 General Election.  We’re into the final ‘sitting week’ of the 50th Parliament.

Pictures, clockwise from top left: 1/ receiving the petition to Parliament of Sue O’Neill and 110 others for better broadband in Karitane; 2/ volunteers begin erecting Labour Billboards; 3/ appearing on Backbenches TV with host Wallace Chapman; 4/ door-knocking in Palmerston.

LEAVE A COMMENT